Supply Chain


Calm Before the Storm

31/10/2019 08:33 | Share

In the downtime between storms, companies can take crucial steps to help prevent supply chain disruption.

Prime editing: DNA tool could correct 89% of genetic defects

21/10/2019 17:40 | Share

New technology – called prime editing – is like a “genetic word processor” able to re-write DNA.

Customer demand driving the automated warehouse

21/10/2019 17:38 | Share

In today’s fast paced world, consumer expectations on receiving products and services is higher than ever as we want it all instantly.

Customer demand is one of the clear leading factors driving uptake of automation in manufacturing warehouses today, as customers expect next-day delivery or at th…

Algorhythm: Twenty Years Later and the Optimization Rhythm Has Not Missed a Beat

21/10/2019 17:38 | Share

It’s been almost a decade since we covered Algorhythm (Part I and Part II), and that’s because the last time the doctor caught up with them mid-decade, they were deep into creating their new accelerated cloud-native rapid application development platform, called AppliFire, with native mobile-first development support capabilities. And while it was very interesting, it was not Supply Chain focussed at the time, and not the core of what SI covers.

But fast forward about five years later, and Algorhythm has re-built their entire Supply Chain Planning, Optimization and Execution Management platform on top of this new development platform and now has one of the most modern cloud-native suites on the market — which not only has the capabilities of big name peers like Kinaxis, E2 Open and Infor, but also the ability to run on any mobile platform with seamless integration across modules and platforms.

And their optimization capabilities are still among the best on the market, and possibly only rivaled by Coupa Sourcing Optimization (powered by their Trade Extensions acquisition) — demonstrated by the fact that whether you are dealing with a demand plan, manufacturing plan, production plan, supply plan, logistics plan, route plan, or any other plan supported by the system, their system can find the optimal solution no matter how many demand locations, plans, sites, suppliers, products, lanes, etc. — and can do so rapidly if the user doesn’t overload the scenario with unnecessary constraints. (Even without constraints, these models can get huge, as the doctor knows all too well, but yet they solve rather rapidly in the Algorhythm platform.)

The Algorhythm suite of twelve (12) integrated Supply Chain Planning, Optimization, and Execution Management Modules is not only one of the most complete end-to-end suites on the market, but one of the most seamlessly integrated as well. It’s very easy to take the output of the “Demand Planner” (which allows the entire organization to collaborate on forecasts) and pump it into the “Manufacturing Network” (which integrates with the “Distribution Network” and “Inventory Planner”) to create a manufacturing (site) plan and then pump that into the “Production Planner” to create a manufacturing schedule by site and then push that into the “Logistics Planner” to determine the best logistics plan and then push that output into the “Route Planner” to optimize lanes and so on. (The suite also includes a “Supply Planner” to optimize individual shipments for JIT manufacturing; a S&OP planner to help sales and operations balance demand vs. supply; a “Manufacturing Execution System” to break PDI (Production Parameters) down, fetch actual production data, and validate results; a “Distributor Ordering” Management module to automatically create distributor orders across thousands of distributors; and a “Beat Planner” to optimize last mile delivery for outbound supply chain for distributors or CPG companies in geographies — like Asia — where last mile is difficult (due to inability to send large trucks, need to restock daily, etc.) With the exception of strategic sourcing and initial supplier selection, they basically have inbound demand to outbound supply covered in terms of supply chain optimization and management once you know the suppliers you are going to buy from and the products that are acceptable to you.

The UI is homogenous across the suite, and the modern web-based components such as drill-down menus, buttons, pop-ups, and so on make the suite easy to use — especially when it comes to tables and reports. The application supports built-in dynamic Excel like grids and tables which can be altered dynamically on the fly with built-in pagination to make navigation and view-control navigable, especially on tablets (for users on the go). It also supports standard (Excel-like) charts and graphs with drill-down, as well as modern calendar and interactive Google Map components. Navigation is easy, with bread-crumb trails so a user doesn’t get lost, and response time is great. It’s powerful and useable, which is exactly what you need to manage your supply chain on-the-go.

There’s a reason they have some of the biggest names in the F500 as clients, and that reason is their unique combination of

  1. power,
  2. ease of use, and
  3. and understanding of the Asian supply chain needs (especially around last-mile delivery).

The last point is especially relevant as many of the big name American (and even German) supply chain companies don’t really understand the unique complexities of (last-mile) supply chains in India and Asia. However, Algorhythm’s unique capability combined with their understanding has made their platform a force to be reckoned with in a market that is one of the hardest in the world. And as a result, they have built a platform that is more than sufficient for every other market as well. the doctor is looking forward to seeing more of Algorhythm outside of the Asian market as, at least in his view, the supply chain market in general needs a good kick in the pants as innovation there-in has considerably lagged the Source-to-Pay market that we primarily cover here on SI.

So if you need a good Supply Chain Orchestration solution, the doctor strongly encourages you to check out Algorhythm … you won’t be disappointed.

Aspects of the Tax Efficient Supply Chain

21/10/2019 17:38 | Share

Many companies overlook function-based tax planning where the supply chain is involved. Considering that tax reductions, or even tax payment delays in Free Trade Zones can save a company millions and millions of dollars, and free up millions more in working capital, tax considerations should play a major role in your supply chain, and in your supply chain finance, efforts — especially now that tariffs are skyrocketing and you need every source of savings you can find.

When you consider that tax-planning affects both supply chain steps (including supply, distribution, retail channels, and customer delivery) and supply chain management processes (including procurement, EDI, merchandising, financing, branding, and asset management) and that it applies both above-the-line (taxes that impact operating income) and below-the-line (taxes that impact income-based taxes), it has far reaching implications. Furthermore tax issues permeate every aspect of identifying, acquiring, importing, transporting, distributing and selling goods and tax planning can impact almost every aspect of the supply chain. This means that tax savings can be almost anywhere. Some of the possibilities that have been noted on this blog in the past include the following:

  • Procurement
    Ownership of the transaction is key as it allows the taxpayer to determine the subject matter, value of each component, and the appropriate jurisdiction, because the right balance can minimize tax.

    • in many states, intangible assets are not subject to property tax — thus, including a warranty cost in a capitalized asset unnecessarily increases a company’s property tax base
    • in many states / jurisdictions, electronically downloaded software is not subject to sales tax
    • disconnecting volume or contract inducement payments from the purchase of the underlying property can cause sales or property taxes to be overstated
    • appropriate planning can often reduce customs and duties
  • Brand Management
    Brand management also has tax implications.

    • the determination of where branding occurs in the supply chain, and thus where value is added, determines the situs of taxability and the value of goods for import, export, and tax purposes
    • the ability to license and protect IP associated with the brand often impacts the jurisdiction of income taxation
    • the situs of where IP is held impacts the tax costs of dispositions
  • Merchandising and Marketing
    Critical in retail operations, they carry their own tax implications.

    • site selection determines property tax
    • capitalization of store design costs have tax implications
  • Finance
    Finance structuring can have significant tax implications.

    • the capital structure of a legal entity can impact its franchise tax profile
    • internal leverage can reduce state income taxes in some jurisdictions
  • Customer Relationship Management
    There are tax implications in building an infrastructure to compile and store customer information.

    • there are state income tax implications wherever such data is stored and maintained.
    • an ability to license and protect IP impacts the jurisdiction of income taxation
    • capitalization of CRM software has property tax implications
  • Distribution of Asset Management
    Distribution management is more than just minimizing logistics costs.

    • an incorrect valuation of inventory can lead to higher taxes
    • some jurisdictions have sales tax exemptions for transportation equipment in inter-state commerce
    • distribution activities that are not separated into separate legal entities can expose a company’s major profit centers to unnecessary multi-state income taxation
  • Retail
    • the employee-intensive nature can lead to process-based payroll tax incompliance and / or unnecessary over-payments
    • state income tax savings can often be found on international distribution assets
    • inefficiently designed gift-card programs can cause unnecessary escheatment of funds

Furthermore, this might just be the tip of the iceberg in tax savings opportunities available to your supply-chain based business. Especially when you consider the numerous benefits of tax-efficient procurement, which include:

  • prevention of incorrect or duplicative taxation
  • matching subsequent rebates or discounts with original purchases to reduce the overall taxable purchase price
  • structuring the transaction to fit within a statutory or regulatory exemption
  • unbundling taxable items from non-taxable items
  • identifying taxes that can be reclaimed

In addition, tax-efficient procurement will:

  • improve the sales tax audit trail and reduce the time required to respond to audits
  • allow for more efficient refund claims when errors have been made or the corporation is entitled to a tax rebate / refund
  • greater certainty regarding tax requirements

So get tax efficient. And maybe you can at least counter all of the duties and tariffs being imposed in the trade war.

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