• Angela Counsell

    Angela Counsell 06/10/2017 04:50PM

    In Procure to Pay

    What's your best top tips to give to someone new to procurement?

    A 'newbie' to the world of procurement and would love to know everyone's thoughts!

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  • Answers (25)

  • Anthea Simon

    09/10/2017 12:04PM

    Hi Angela

    Depending on your route into procurement.. I would say a top tip would be get your CIPS qualifications, this is the advice I was given by my mentor who is a CPO for a leading manufacturing company. Another tip a large portion of procurement involves meeting and collaboratively working with suppliers, stakeholders, multi-agencies, end users so it helps if you enjoy meeting new people and you can confidently share your thoughts and opinions. Another top tip; if you have ambitions to excel within your procurement career I would say try and get yourself a mentor. Another tip is read... read... read.... read around procurement there is so much information out there on procurement, supply chain management anything and everything you want to know about this' wonderful world of procurement'... I spend a good portion of my day reading procurement material whether on the internet, books, audios. Also ask questions... I work closely with the Head of Procurement for my organisation, and I'm always asking him questions if I don't understand anything or I just want to learn more about something.

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  • Chuck Intrieri

    06/11/2017 03:03PM

    The key to procurement is collaboration. Adversarial relationships do not work. It has to be"win-win for both parties.

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  • Mike Lewis

    06/11/2017 02:49PM

    Support your decisions to (or not to) purchase with data. Understand your supply chain. Become an expert in your field of purchase. View your critical suppliers as partners and develop relationships based on positive mutual benefit.

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  • Philip Brown

    09/10/2017 07:12PM

    Enjoy what you do and don't forget those procurement skills are transferable so don't be afraid to move companies AND industries.

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  • Grahame Ball MSc FCIPS FCILT

    09/10/2017 08:34AM

    get qualified...

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  • Tahj Bomar, SPSM

    20/11/2017 01:04PM

    All great answers, the great thing is not one answer fits you’re question, as procurement/Purchasing is a fun job. I would just say work on bringing value to your end users and customers (suppliers and co-workers). People, process, and technology. The process and technology, figure what works in the company culture/environment. But, getting people on board and understanding I find
    is the key! Create a “win-win” situation.

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  • Julian Acosta

    13/11/2017 04:22PM

    Make sure you are the bus driver on your projects.

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  • Jim Reed

    06/11/2017 03:52PM

    Having been in senior procurement positions for the last 18 years in almost every sector, in my book procurement operates most efficiently on spend analysis, ie understanding in your company, area, category or commodity exactly what you are spending on what products with whom and why. I have been asked to save money several times in an area where the spend was low, optimised and attacking it would have been a waste of time, whilst big ticket opportunities would have been ignored. Being able to articulate the spend context has always enabled me to turn that round.

    Also look at the art of the possible: benchmarking with peers, existing supply chain frameworks and analysts will give you a real view of how much you can improve your supply chain whether it is reducing cost, improving functionality or decreasing risk.

    As an FCIPS I agree with all of the other comments - and above all good luck and enjoy. It is the best job I have ever done!

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  • Andy Duckworth

    06/11/2017 02:02PM

    Enjoy it, it's a great profession that can make a real difference to peoples lives and the planet we live on

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  • Eric Lynch

    02/11/2017 08:07PM

    All great recommendations so far. My question back to you is what function are you in today? Are you a practitioner in a procurement operation? Are you a category manager? Are you in Sourcing? Are you a buyer? What is your role? Happy to help!

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    Eric Lynch My bad! I just read your profile. I recommend you connect with Retail focused consulting firms and leverage their knowledge base and learn from professionals and your peers on best practices for your given role and industry.

    02/11/2017 08:11PM

  • steven Onyango

    10/10/2017 10:45AM

    Hi Angela, welcome to procurement, have the CIPS qualification you will really enjoy as its much detailed and you will love and relate well with some of the units.

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  • Chris Cliffe FCIPS MIoD

    09/10/2017 01:42PM

    Hi Angela! Welcome to procurement! Yes, CIPS qualification will be very valuable and worthwhile, but no rush, make sure its the profession for you first, and then commit to the training. You've made an awesome start by being here, and asking this question, but my top tip would be to take every opportunity you can to speak to procurement and business folk in and outside of your organisations. The stronger your network, the better a procurement professional you will develop to be.

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  • To add to the above, in addition to collaboration with stakeholders, listen to their needs and make sure you deliver what they are asking. Go into meetings and discussions with a mindset of helping rather than asking for help. Also, brainstorming for ideas often occurs for ideas outside the box, because most of the time, no one person has the best idea - it's often a combination of everyone's efforts that builds the best solution. I also think that in order to get to collaboration, you need to understand the profession's technical fundamentals by gaining some sort of certification, which one here have provided direction on. Good luck!

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  • Karen Walters

    15/01/2018 11:50AM

    I see you already have some key elements identified. So........always keep the "What would you do if it was your money?" point of view. Always look at the bigger picture, as it is easy to fall foul of the "micro trap" and miss great opportunities to save money. A fresh set of eyes will reveal approaches that deliver great vfm, so don't be afraid of voicing them when faced with a room full of people with years of procurement experience (who often get stuck in a rut and need a bit of a shake up). PCR2015 offers opportunities for compliant but flexible procurement solutions - don't be afraid to explore them.

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  • James Ball

    30/12/2017 05:17PM

    Someone new to Procurement and looking to learn and progress could consider; CIPS qualifications (and project management qualifications in parallel), networking, reading (blogs, articles, whitepapers), say yes to as many challenges as you can - you cannot get involved in enough business projects to build multiple category understanding, and identify some good mentors to learn from

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  • Sandra BONIFACE

    29/12/2017 09:49PM

    Be curious. Being a good buyer is about having information (product specs, supply market, stakeholder).

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  • Karl Kuate

    22/11/2017 12:53AM

    Peripheral vision at all times i.e. rather than unit cost think total cost of ownership. Look at impact on all stakeholders and not only benefit to one group.

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  • Fernando Baez

    22/11/2017 12:24AM

    I would could mention 2, first would be to have a clear understanding of the stakeholder's needs. Second, to have the engagement from the stakeholder. At the end, the stakeholder is our client.

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  • Marcin Witkowski

    20/11/2017 07:46PM

    Get as much information as you can about what you are supposed to buy. And one tip when negotiating: Your task is to make a good deal, not to demonstrate to the world how good at negotiating you really are.

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  • Andries Blom

    20/11/2017 12:17PM

    Look, Listen, Think, Ask Questions. Will disarm any internal stakeholder and supplier

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  • Sheri Daneliak

    13/11/2017 01:16PM

    I agree with all above answers. I would also not be afraid to learn as much as I can about other areas of procurement and not stick to just one type of Procurement. Contracting for good and services leads you into a vast range of monetary and technical expertise and furthers your knowledge of the supply chain and makes you a much more versatile Procurement Specialist. If you have a legal Department don’t be afraid to discuss a problem with them if you’re unable to find the answers you need from another Procurement Specialist because this is a forever changing
    environment. Do get your training certification. Make ethical choices when at times you may be pushed to do otherwise. Don’t be afraid to make mistakes because it’s part of the learning curve but do own up to those mistakes and learn from them. Always...when in doubt, ask for help. Procurement is competitive, deadline oriented and sometimes stressful but you’ll find working with your clients, whom ever they may be is ultimately the most rewarding approach for both
    parties and when the contract is finally complete, there is no greater feeling until you begin your next one!

    Read everything you can get your hands on concerning Procurement and Supply Chain until you can get your certification. This site is a great place for help.

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  • Terry Gittins

    13/11/2017 11:18AM

    As previously said, obtain CIPS, know where the money is being spent and build relationships. Listening is the key - find out what you customer wants and work with them to achieve it. Keep it simple and you will bring them with you. :o)

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  • Trevor Black

    06/11/2017 03:08PM

    Irrespective of your qualifications if you want to make the difference I recommend:- 1. Know your supply chains and identify the risks, 2. Do not follow the flow and make your own decisions, 3.Be true to yourself, 4.Be steadfast in the face of adversity, 5. Work for organisations that are ethical and where you are valued, 6. Don't just get CIPS qualifications - get involved with your professional body and learn from your fellow professionals, 7. Don't be afraid of making difficult or unpopular decisions - you are employed to make a difference and not win popularity contests. But above all - enjoy it - it is a great profession.

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  • Chuck Intrieri

    06/11/2017 03:08PM

    Earn your credentials and gain experience by trial and error. Learn from your mistakes. Join Procurement organizations and learn from your peers. Always have at least three suppliers for a bid/proposal. Visit your Suppliers. How do you know they are not working remote, at home?

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  • Ed King

    02/11/2017 02:27PM

    Probably not relevant to all categories, but "part numbers are your friends"

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